Hydro Electric Power Stations

Bastyan Power Station

Bastyan Power Station opened in 1983 located at Lake Rosebery on the West Coast. Bastyan has one Francis style turbine, with a generating capacity of 79.9MW of electricity. Bastyan was constructed as a part of the Pieman River Power Development it is an above ground power station the second in the development and it also has its own dam and lake (lake Rosebery) that was all built over between 1974 and 1987.


Butlers Gorge Power Station

Butlers Gorge Power Station is at the foot of the 67 metre Clark Dam on the Upper Derwent River. It is fed by the waters from lake King William and was commissioned in 1951. The opening ceremony was 22 November 1952. It has one Francis type turbine, with a generating capacity of 12.2 MW of electricity.


Catagunya Power Station

Catagunya Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River, it was commissioned in 1962 It has two Francis type turbines fed by the waters of lake Cataguna (via a small canal and a 44 meter penstock) formed by a large rock fill dam, with a combined generating capacity of 48 MW of electricity


Cethana Power Station

Cethana Power Station is on the Mersey-Forth catchment in Tasmania. It was opened in 1971, the station is one of only a few underground stations in the state. It has one Francis turbine with a generating capacity of 85 MW of electricity. The station is run by the waters of Lake Cethana, a lake formed by a dam of the same name.


Cluny Power Station

Cluny Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River in Tasmania. It has one Kaplan-type turbine, with a generating capacity of 17 MW of electricity. Cluny was commissioned in 1968.


Devils Gate Power Station

Devils Gate Power Station was commissioned in 1969. It is in the Mersey-Forth catchment. The station has one Francis-type turbine, with a generating capacity of 63 MW. The Devils Gate Dam created Lake Barrington, a world famous rowing venue that hosted the 1990 World Rowing Championships. The dam is 84m high. It is one of the thinnest concrete arch dams in the world.


Fisher Power Station

Fisher Power Station is on the Mersey Forth catchment. It has one Pelton turbine, with a generating capacity of 43.2 MW of electricity. It was commissioned in 1973. The power station is fed by the waters of Lake Mackenzie, which is in turn fed by a dam on the Fisher River, located in the Western Tiers. Rather than being fed directly, the water comes via a tunnel and pipeline (with a drop of 650m). The discharge then flows 4 km before reaching Lake Parangana and then flowing into another dam and power station.


Gordon River Dam

The Gordon Dam (also known as Gordon River Dam), is a double curvature arch dam on the Gordon River in Tasmania, Australia. The dam has a length of 192 metres, and a height of 140 metres, making it the tallest dam in Tasmania and the fifth-tallest in Australia.

Water from the dam drops 183 metres underground into its power station, where three turbines of 144 MW generates up to 432 MW of power, covering about 13% of the electricity demand of Tasmania. The first two turbines were commissioned in 1978, before the third was commissioned a decade later in 1988. The power station is fuelled by water from Lake Gordon. Water from Lake Pedder is also drawn into Lake Gordon through the McPartlans Pass Canal.


John Butters Power Station

John Butters Power Station is part of the King River Power Scheme in Western Tasmania. It has one Francis turbine, with a generating capacity of 144 MW of electricity, and is remotely controlled from the Sheffield Control Centre. Water is fed from Lake Burbury which is dammed by the Crotty Dam in the gap in the West Coast Range between Mount Jukes and Mount Huxley, and to the south by Darwin Dam.
The power station is named after Hydro Tasmania's first general manager and chief engineer, John Butters. It was one of the last hydro electric power stations built by the HEC before its disaggregation and transformation to Hydro Tasmania.


Lake Echo Power Station

Lake Echo Power Station is in the Lower Derwent River catchment area. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 32.4 MW of electricity. Lake Echo was commissioned in 1956.


Lemonthyme Power Station

Lemonthyme Power Station is on the Mersey Forth catchment. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 51 MW of electricity.
Liapootah Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River. It has three turbines, with a generating capacity of 87.3 MW of electricity. Liapootah was commissioned in 1960.


Lake Margaret Power Station

Lake Margaret Power Station was opened in 1936 by Mt Lyle Mining to power their mines it was more recently bought by Hydro Tasmania and closed in 2006. The main interest in this station is the fact that the pipe line from the dam to the power station is entirely made of wood. The wooden pipe line is also the reason for the stations closure as it became to expensive to maintain. The pipe line required an inspection and��maintenance tramway, which now doubles as a walking trail and is open to the public.


Mackintosh Power Station

Mackintosh Power Station is at Lake Mackintosh, West Coast Tasmania. Mackintosh has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 79.9MW of electricity. Mackintosh was constructed as a part of the Pieman River Power Development, between 1974 and 1987. The water discharged from Mackintosh flows into Lake Rosebery.


Meadowbank Power Station

Meadowbank Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River; it was opened in 1963. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 40 MW of electricity.


Paloona Power Station

Paloona Power Station is on the Mersey-Forth catchment. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 28 MW of electricity.

Parangana Power Station

Parangana power station is part of the Mersey-Forth power scheme in Tasmania. It is fed by water from Lake Parangana. It was commissioned in 2002 and recovers 0.75MW of energy that would otherwise be lost.


Poatina Power Station

Poatina Power Station is in the Great Lake and South Esk catchment area. It was Tasmania's first underground power station. Poatina has six turbines, with a combined generating capacity of 300 MW of electricity. Poatina makes use of a 900 meter drop from the Great Western Tiers to the Norfolk Plains in Tasmania's northern Midlands. Water from Great Lake is diverted via a tunnel to the edge of the Great Western Tiers where it plummets down a viable penstock line, which enters the ground again near the power station. The Poatina Power Station is located in a massive artificial cavern hence the name Poatina, Palawa for "cavern" or "cave". Poatina was commissioned in 1964, and replaced the Waddamana and Shannon power stations. The small construction village, Poatina, sits perched on top of a low plateaux, 3.5 km from the stations subterranean location.


Reece Power Station

Reece Power Station is at Lake Pieman, West Coast, Tasmania. It is coincidental with the Lower Pieman Dam also known as the Reece Dam. This power station was constructed as a part of the Pieman River Power Development, between 1974 and 1987. It has two turbines, with a combined generating capacity of 231.2MW of electricity.


Repulse Power Station

Repulse Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 28 MW of electricity. Repulse was approved by parliament in 1961.


Rowallan Power Station

Rowallan Power Station is on the Mersey Forth catchment, 25 kilometres south of Liena. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 10.5 MW of electricity and is operated by Hydro Tasmania. Work commenced on the project in 1963.

The associated Rowallan Lake which is 11 kilometres long and 9 square kilometres in area, is 488 metres above sea level and is bordered by Clumner Bluff (1449 metres) and Howells Bluff (1245 metres). It is managed by the Inland Fisheries Service as a trout fishery; both Brown trout and Rainbow trout are stocked; there are also native Climbing galaxias, Spotted galaxias and River blackfish.

Lake Rowallan is also the starting point for walks into nearby highland areas including the Walls of Jerusalem National Park. In 2010, press reports raised concerns


Shannon Power Station

Shannon Power station was built to use the water from Great Lake before it ran onto Penstock Lagoon and Waddamana. A second power station was built at Waddamana - Waddamana B. All three power stations continued to operate until 1964, when Waddamana A and Shannon were decommissioned.


Tarraleah Power Station

Tarraleah Power Station is on the Upper Derwent River. It has six Pelton class turbines, with a generating capacity of 90 MW of electricity. It was opened in 1938. The nearby township of Tarraleah was originally built in the 1930s by the Hydro Electric Commission to house Tasmania's pioneering hydro electricity officers and management. After a multi-million dollar redevelopment, the former Hydro construction village has become a 120 ha estate that comprises Tarraleah Lodge with accommodation, dining options. Fresh water trout fishing, boating, bushwalking, mountain biking and kayaking are all popular activities in and around the township. Tarraleah is also home to one of the highest altitude golf courses in Australia.


Tods Corner Power Station

Tods Corner Power Station recovers part of the energy used in pumping the water from Arthurs Lake back up to Great Lake. The rest, and more, is recovered when the water is used at Poatina. Commissioned in 1966, it has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 1.7 MW of electricity.


Trevallyn Power Station

Duck Reach Power Station was replaced by Trevallyn Power Station in 1955. Trevallyn Power Station is on the Tamar River north of Launceston in Tasmania. It has four Francis turbines, with a combined generating capacity of 90 MW of electricity. It uses water diverted from the South Esk River by the Trevallyn Dam. Trevallyn and Poatina are the only hydroelectric power stations currently located in the drainage basin of the South Esk River. Trevallyn Power Station was commissioned in 1955, replacing the Duck Reach Power Station.


Tribute Power Station

Tribute Power Station is in Western Tasmania. Tribute has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 84MW of electricity. Tribute was commissioned in 1994 as part of the Anthony Power Development, and was considered to be part of the last hydro-electric power development in Tasmania.


Tungatinah Power Station

Tungatinah Power Station is in the Lower Derwent River catchment area. It has five turbines, with a combined generating capacity of 125 MW of electricity. Tungatinah's five 25 MW turbines were commissioned between 1953 and 1956.


Waddamana Power Station

Waddamana Power Station is the site of Hydro Tasmania's first hydropower station. A private company started construction on Waddamana in 1910, but the project struck financial trouble. In 1914 the Tasmanian Government bought the partly built works and formed the Hydro-Electric Department to take over. In 1916 power generation began.

A second power station was built at Waddamana - Waddamana B. All three power stations continued to operate until 1964, when Waddamana A and Shannon were decommissioned. Waddamana B continued to operate until 1994. Poatina power station was built to the north of Great Lake to replaced Waddamana.

The Waddamana power station now has a new life as a museum filled with original equipment and other displays.


Wayatinah Power Station

Wayatinah Power Station is on the Lower Derwent River. It has three turbines, with a combined generating capacity of 38.25 MW of electricity. Wayatinah was commissioned in 1957.


Wilmot Power Station

Wilmot Power Station is on the Mersey Forth catchment. It has one turbine, with a generating capacity of 30.6 MW of electricity.

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